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News :: Human Rights : International
MIT Announces Targeted Divestment from Sudan: Darfur Advocates Celebrate, Ask for Transparency
15 May 2007
Cambridge, MA – The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) took an unprecedented step yesterday, announcing that it will pursue a divestment strategy in rejection of "abhorrent acts" in Darfur. The decision follows a campaign lead by MIT students asking for the Institute to pursue targeted divestment from those companies, such as China's largest oil company PetroChina, that fund the Sudanese government.

In a press statement dated Monday, May 14th, the Institute stated, "MIT is reviewing the securities portfolios over which it may exercise direct investment discretion and will divest as appropriate for those portfolios to exclude securities that would violate MIT's investment principles." The statement refers to the U.S. and UN declarations of acts amounting to genocide in Sudan, but does not clearly state the criteria for divestment. MIT did not fully divest from South Africa during the anti-apartheid movement in the 80's and early 90s.
FacesOfDarfur.jpg
The divestment strategy advocated by MIT students excludes from divestment companies that provide vital needs to large parts of the Sudanese population - such as agriculture and pharmaceutical companies. MIT students will continue to raise awareness about the genocide in Darfur. This Thursday, students are holding a die-in and fundraiser in the main lobby of MIT's central building to raise awareness about the loss of life in Darfur.

In an email to student advocates, Kirk Kolenbrander, Vice President for Institute Affairs and Secretary of the Corporation, referring to the divestment announcement stated, "We are grateful for the thoughtful perspectives members of the community have brought to bear on these complex questions. MIT does not expect to comment on this matter beyond the attached statement." Anti-genocide advocates are pleased with the decision, but remain concerned with the Institute's lack of transparency regarding its processes and investment principles.

"The decision is encouraging, however, we'll really have to see how and when it is implemented before we can pass any real judgment. It is critical we divest from the right companies and in a timely manner. I hope in the future, MIT Corporation will attempt to make the decision-making process transparent and democratic. We need a mechanism to factor social responsibility into our endowment investment decisions." commented Kayvan Zainabadi, a student at MIT and leader in the divestment push.

The MIT decision comes after a concerted campaign from students concerned about the ongoing genocide in Darfur. A divestment petition asking for Institute-wide 'targeted-divestment' by December 31st, 2006 collected over 500 signatures at a campus where student activism is largely absent. Both MIT student governments, the Graduate Student Council and Undergraduate Association, voted overwhelmingly in favor of targeted-divestment by the end of 2006.

On Friday, May 4th, the MIT Corporation Executive Committee went over the ACSR recommendations on the Darfur issue and determined that more time was needed for a decision. Tuesday, May 8th, students filled the President's office and demanded a specific timeline for when a divestment decision will be made, a release of the ACSR report to the public, transparency regarding the entire process, and a meeting with MIT President Susan Hockfield.

MIT is considered a late comer to the divestment issue, so far 42 universities and 13 states have divested according to the Fidelity Out of Sudan campaign. The last time the Institute convened the Advisory Committee on Shareholder Responsibility (ACSR) to discuss the implications of its investments was in 1999 according to the Sustainable Endowments Institute.

Related article:
“Not on our watch, not on our time!” The people of Massachusetts take action for a promise the world failed to keep: “Genocide: never again”
http://boston.indymedia.org/feature/display/199165/index.php

View the MIT announcement at:
See also:
http://web.mit.edu/newsoffice/2007/sudan-statement.html
http://www.sudandivestment.org/home.asp

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Displaced, Imprisoned Darfurian Refugee
15 May 2007
Daoud Ibarahaem Hari is one of only three Darfuris who have reportedly been granted refugee status in the United States in the past four years. Daoud fled Sudan in 2003 after an attack on his village in northern Darfur. Then, he did something that few of his fellow hundreds of thousands of refugees have done: He went back to Darfur. In August 2006, he and American journalist Paul Salopek - a Pulitzer Prize winning reporter for the Chicago Tribune - and their driver were imprisoned in Darfur by the Sudanese government for 35 days. Daoud endured harsh treatment including torture and threats to his life. After international pressure, the three were eventually released. [includes rush transcript] The situation in Darfur has been described by the United Nations as the world’s worst humanitarian crisis. More than 200,000 people have been killed and two and a half million displaced in fighting between rebels and government-backed militias since early 2003. While the Bush administration has described the situation as a genocide, only three Darfuris have reportedly been granted refugee status in the United States in the past four years. My next guest is one of those three. His name is Daoud Ibarahaem Hari. He arrived in the US eight weeks ago after a nightmarish ordeal in his home country.

Daoud fled Sudan in 2003 after an attack on his village in northern Darfur. His brother was killed and his family was scattered across Sudan. Daoud eventually found refuge in neighboring Chad. Then, he did something that few of his fellow hundreds of thousands of refugees have done: He went back to Darfur. Using a false name and passport, Daoud returned six times over the next three years, leading Western journalists through the region.

In August 2006, he and American journalist Paul Salopek - a Pulitzer Prize winning reporter for the Chicago Tribune - and their driver were imprisoned in Darfur by the Sudanese government for 35 days. Daoud endured harsh treatment including torture and threats to his life. After international pressure, the three were eventually released. Daoud returned to Chad where he was granted refugee status by the United States. He now lives in Asbury Park, New Jersey.

* Daoud Ibarahaem Hari. Thirty-three-year-old refugee from Darfur who was imprisoned last summer with an American journalist in Darfur. He has been resettled to the United States.

* Christopher Nugent. Attorney with the law firm, Holland & Knight in Washington, DC.

RUSH TRANSCRIPT

This transcript is available free of charge. However, donations help us provide closed captioning for the deaf and hard of hearing on our TV broadcast. Thank you for your generous contribution.
Donate - $25, $50, $100, more...

AMY GOODMAN: The situation in Darfur has been described by the United Nations as the world's worst humanitarian crisis. More than 200,000 people have been killed and 2.5 million displaced in fighting between rebels and government-backed militias since early 2003.

While the Bush administration has described the situation as a genocide, only three Darfuris have reportedly been granted refugee status in the United States in the past four years. My next guest is one of those three. His name is Daoud Hari. He arrived in the United States eight weeks ago after a nightmarish ordeal in his home country. Daoud fled Sudan in 2003 after an attack on his village in northern Darfur. His brother was killed, his family scattered across Sudan. Daoud eventually found refuge in neighboring Chad.

Then he did something few of his fellow hundreds of thousands of refugees have done: he went back to Darfur. Using a false name and passport, Daoud returned six times over the next three years, leading Western journalists through the region. In August 2006, he and American journalist Paul Salopek, a Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter for the Chicago Tribune, and their driver were imprisoned in Darfur by the Sudanese government for thirty-five days. Daoud endured harsh treatment, including torture and threats to his life. After international pressure, the three were eventually released. Daoud returned to Chad, where he was granted refugee status by the United States. He now lives in Asbury Park, New Jersey.

Today, Daoud Hari joins us in our firehouse studio. Welcome to Democracy Now!

DAOUD IBARAHAEM HARI: Thank you.

AMY GOODMAN: You grew up in Darfur?

DAOUD IBARAHAEM HARI: Yeah.

AMY GOODMAN: Until how old were you, you were there and learned English?

DAOUD IBARAHAEM HARI: I born in Darfur, in North Darfur, and I stay at a village called Mozbed and my primary school in that village until the [inaudible] school finished in Darfur. Through my years, all my years, I grow in Sudan. So just only 2003 I left Sudan.

AMY GOODMAN: Why did you leave?

DAOUD IBARAHAEM HARI: I left Sudan, you know, when the problems began in Darfur. That’s the same for all the Darfurians. They all leave the village, and, you know, there’s mass attacks from the government and the Janjaweed for the Darfurian people.

AMY GOODMAN: Explain who the Janjaweed are.

DAOUD IBARAHAEM HARI: The Janjaweed is the people, Darfurian Arabs, nomad. They have, you know, horses, and they have camels. They were supplied weapons by the government.

AMY GOODMAN: How do you know they got those weapons from the government, from the Sudanese government?

DAOUD IBARAHAEM HARI: Because they were coming with the government troops, so they had the supplies because those guns they had, there is not any marketing for -- the gun markets or where they can get these guns. So the government supplies them, and they use with their troop, and they go in Darfur.

AMY GOODMAN: Explain what happened to your family.

DAOUD IBARAHAEM HARI: My family, as the other families in Darfur, the whole villages be destroyed by attacking by air, Antonov bombing and, you know, with the helicopters. And the government troops with the Janjaweed, they shelling the areas, and the people were fleeing.

AMY GOODMAN: How old were you?

DAOUD IBARAHAEM HARI: I’m thirty-four now.

AMY GOODMAN: And at the time of the attack?

DAOUD IBARAHAEM HARI: Three years. Thirty-one years.

AMY GOODMAN: Were you with your brother when he was killed?

DAOUD IBARAHAEM HARI: Yes. Actually, it's not with him, but we tried to keep into people pushing out. But there is -- the people have to defend. And the children and women, we have to get out. So as soon as we were running, we know that he’s dead.

AMY GOODMAN: You became a translator for the Chicago Tribune reporter. You later became for Nicholas Kristof, who wrote a piece about you yesterday. You were his translator, as well. But explain what happened when you were all kidnapped.

DAOUD IBARAHAEM HARI: We were kidnapped in August 6, last year, something like one hour and a half from the Chadian border crossing to Darfur. Just we are driving, and we suddenly stopped by some -- the militias. It’s not militia, the Sudan Liberation Army, who have peace with the government of Sudan. And we stop, and they asking me, “Where you go?” I said, “I’m going to Farawia.”

AMY GOODMAN: You were with Paul Salopek then and the driver?

DAOUD IBARAHAEM HARI: Yes. Yes. And we’re going to Farawia, and we coming back soon. They said, “Why you didn’t call?” I said I knew that Farawia there is not under any control of SLA, and it's very close to the border, something like seventy-five kilometers from the border. So after a while, they separate us, and we had long discussion, ’til they tied me and tied my driver, and they took Paul in the car and we in the back of car. They took us.

AMY GOODMAN: What happened to you in captivity?

DAOUD IBARAHAEM HARI: I think they -- anyhow, they accused me that, you know, a spy.

AMY GOODMAN: They said you were a spy?

DAOUD IBARAHAEM HARI: Yeah, I was spying for the America or international media, something like that. And, of course, they knew me that before the peace I will be enter with them something like six times in Darfur, but yeah.

AMY GOODMAN: You were released after thirty-five days.

DAOUD IBARAHAEM HARI: Yeah, actually we were released in 9 -- September 9, yes, after thirty-seven or thirty-eight days.

AMY GOODMAN: And that's when you went to Chad.

DAOUD IBARAHAEM HARI: Yeah, that's when I went to Chad in 11 September. And after that, I got little problem in Chad, and UNSCR helped me to get back --

AMY GOODMAN: They were going to return you to Darfur, to Sudan?

DAOUD IBARAHAEM HARI: Yes. Yes. You know, between two countries there's a lot of different ICEs, so before I was using in Chad a different name, but when they released -- when they captured me in Sudan, they knew that I’m a Darfuri and [inaudible] over there, and they give, I think, they supply for the Chadian government or Chadian security, that’s my real name, and the Chadians, they knew that I am not a Chadian, I’m Darfurian, I’m working with not any permission. So that’s what caused me some problem, and as a problem, they wanted to return me to Sudan.

AMY GOODMAN: Why did you translate for reporters? How did you end up doing that for Paul Salopek of the Chicago Tribune, for Nicholas Kristof of the New York Times?

DAOUD IBARAHAEM HARI: You know, we have to do something, as we are Darfurian. We [inaudible]. All the area was burning. The people were dying. And all the village were burned, and, you know, everything was devastated. So this is my way to let international media know what is happening in Darfur exactly. So that’s why I start to, because the international media, when the journalists they come, they need to cross Darfur. They wanted to see what's happening exactly. So they need someone from Darfur. They know the roads and they took them to villages and where the people were buried, so I know, so I have to do that.

AMY GOODMAN: We're also joined in Washington, D.C., by Chris Nugent, an immigration attorney who represented Daoud in his bid to come to the United States. Can you talk about the process by which Daoud Hari became -- got political asylum in this country and how difficult it is? What, was he one of three Darfuris who have gotten that in the United States?

CHRISTOPHER NUGENT: Good morning, Amy.

AMY GOODMAN: It’s good to have you with us.

CHRISTOPHER NUGENT: Yes, thank you. It's a pleasure to be here. Daoud had an extraordinary case that we were able to bring to the attention of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees Office and the US government. And as the threats escalated against him in Darfur and in November he was actually being threatened by the Chadian government to be swapped as a prisoner of war with the Sudanese, we were able to get him out of Chad to Akra, Ghana, where the US government processed him as a refugee and resettled him into the United States in record time.

It only took three months to actually get him from beginning to end of the process, whereas for many refugees abroad going through the refugee resettlement process, it can take upwards to a year. So this was expedited processing, given the severe risk of harm that he faced both in Chad, as well as Sudan, if he had been deported to Sudan. So we're very thankful to the US government for paying attention to his predicament and acting very quickly on his case.

AMY GOODMAN: Now, Daoud had some high-level intervention. Bono spoke on his behalf, former President Jimmy Carter, as well as New Mexico Governor and presidential -- Democratic presidential candidate, Bill Richardson. What about people who have less high-level connections? And, of course, he was a translator for major reporters in this country.

CHRISTOPHER NUGENT: Yes, well, refugee resettlement is considered the least preferred of endurable solution for refugees abroad. The first solution under international law that is prioritized is voluntary repatriation to the country of origin. The second solution is considered integration in the country of refuge. The third solution is refugee resettlement. So it is not something that is available to all refugees abroad, and refugees are hand-picked based on their characteristics of being vulnerable or having family ties in the United States for the resettlement process.

So, Daoud, ironically, when he was in Ghana, you know, ran into Darfuri family members who had been living in camps in Ghana for four to five years, who are not eligible for the resettlement process. Daoud was eligible because of his extraordinary circumstances as a marked man in Chad, as well as in Sudan. But refugee resettlement is not for everyone, and most refugees are not going to be resettled to the United States or an industrialized country.

AMY GOODMAN: Daoud, do you know many people from Darfur who perhaps have applied for refugee status here or political asylum in the United States?

DAOUD IBARAHAEM HARI: I have been in contact in Ghana something like several hundred Darfurians in refugees camp in Ghana. Those something like from 700, 250 families, they have very hard circumstances in Ghana, and they use to apply for resettlement in United States, in Canada and Australia, but very few of them they get a chance to resettlement in Australia, something like thirteen person from 700 in Australia, but they didn't get a chance to resettlement in United States at all.

AMY GOODMAN: You're living in Asbury Park, New Jersey, now. What are your plans?

DAOUD IBARAHAEM HARI: My plan, of course, I’m going to looking for school for educating some years. And I have to talk about Darfur everywhere or be on anytime to let the news people, the United States people, they know that’s what is happening right now in Darfur.

AMY GOODMAN: Well, I want to thank you very much for being with us. Daoud Hari is here in the United States, did receive political asylum, was from Darfur. We'll link to his stories on our website at democracynow.org. Christopher Nugent, an attorney with the law firm Holland & Knight in Washington, D.C., worked with him in getting political asylum in the United States. Thank you for joining us.

DAOUD IBARAHAEM HARI: Thank you.
See also:
http://www.democracynow.org/article.pl?sid=07/05/15/1515223
"Save Darfur" Warmongers Scam
16 May 2007
Ruth Messinger advises Jewish students at Harvard Hillel:

Using Humanitarian Language as Fundraising Technique





On April 27, 2007, Ruth Messinger, president and executive director of the American Jewish World Service (AJWS), was welcomed by the Harvard Jewish students’ organization, Hillel, for an inspirational talk. Hillel often hosts these “invitation only” events where Jewish students can connect with important figures in politics, arts or the media. Ruth Messinger was described by the organizers as someone who “has combined a tireless commitment to public service and social justice with deep reflection on the nexus between Jewish and universal values.” The talk focused on how to use human rights language to promote a positive image of “Jewishness.”



Messinger described how each generation in her family became more “Jewish” than the one before. Her mother, Miriam Messinger served as director of public relations for the Jewish Theological Seminary in the 1930s, and was instrumental in developing Messinger’s passion for her own ethnic group.



Messinger described how out of place she felt being Jewish in home-grown America, when she attended the Oklahoma School of Social Work. She said it was like going to live in a third world country like Zimbabwe. Because she was the only Jewish activist in Oklahoma, she was called after graduation to work for the Democratic Party.



Messinger fundraises for lobbying-oriented humanitarian aid through the American Jewish World Service in New York, which is collecting money for “Save Darfur.” Last year she raised approximately $31 million of which Darfur was to receive approximately $3 million. Most of the money donated for relief and development in Sudan was channeled back into Jewish lobbying efforts, Messinger admitted with very little shame, adding that AJWS has no real way to do anything for Sudan. She urged Jewish students to participate in “Save Darfur” as a way to get connected and create a “presence” in world “humanitarianism,” which would engage in a coordinated Jewish effort of organizing, electing and legislating.



Students interested in electoral politics were advised to study social work, to learn how people tick. Messinger suggested that a person hoping to enter politics should hold three or four different jobs in very different fields. Avoid law school because the debt involved in getting a law degree is an obstacle to community service, she advised. Messinger mentioned that NYU forgives student loans for people going into Social Law.


Life is a work of art, Messinger concluded. Every step counts towards your future goals.
Save Darfur
18 May 2007
darfur_2.png
Darfur is vanishing from the African landscape because it is not on the American political agenda. The oil interests want you to ignore 2 million in exile and 10,000 dying each month.
Don't let them distract you from the worst human rights atrocities going on in the world today.
What group of people(men of course) are doing the genocide?
19 May 2007
Who is doing the Genocide? pleez tell us...

Post here now pleeze? Who is doing the killing?

Are the killers muslims killing non-muslims?

Let me clafify......those who CLAIM to be Muslims?

what is the religion of the poeple...what is the religion of the killers? Who is behind the killings?

Way too confusing? TV never tells all.
Stop the U.S. and Zionist War Against Sudan
21 May 2007
Stop the U.S. and Zionist War Against Sudan

By David Rolde

From the Green-Rainbow News and Election Guide 2006

The United States has been waging war against Sudan for the past 15 years, and we need to stop it. Just like with Iraq, the U.S. war against Sudan is a war for oil and a war for Israel. The proposed invasion of Sudan is based on lies. The lie of accusing the government of Sudan of “genocide in Darfur” serves the same function as the lie a few years ago accusing the government of Iraq of “possessing weapons of mass destruction”. The U.S. government, and its allies the Israeli and UK governments, are the real world champion purveyors of genocide and possessors of WMDs.

Sudan, the geographically largest country in Africa and the home of 35 million people, has been devastated by U.S. attacks for the past 15 years. In the early 90s the U.S. government declared Sudan to be a "state sponsor of terrorism" because the government of Sudan does not support Israel. The U.S. government imposed sanctions against Sudan. The U.S. sanctions and trade boycott escalated in severity several times during the 90s and 00s and damaged the Sudanese economy causing immense human suffering. Throughout the 90s the U.S. government armed and funded the SPLA rebels in the south of Sudan in a war against the Sudanese government, and against rival southern groups, in which millions of persons were killed or displaced. Millions of southern refugees fled from the SPLA and now live in Khartoum, the northern capital. The culmination of U.S. support for war in Sudan was the so-called "Sudan Peace Act", signed by George W Bush in 2002, which allocated one hundred million dollars per year to the SPLA.

One notable episode of the US war against Sudan happened in 1998 when the U.S. government of Bill Clinton, with a missile strike, destroyed Sudan's only pharmaceutical plant, the al-Shifa plant near Khartoum. This rendered Sudan unable to produce needed human medications to treat endemic diseases such as malaria and also veterinary medicines needed by Sudan's livestock industry which is a major part of the livelihood of the people of Sudan.

In 2004, during the U.S. presidential election campaign, the U.S. government started leveling false allegations of "genocide" against the Sudanese government in regards to the new civil war in Darfur in the west of Sudan. The U.S. media and pro-imperialist “human rights” organizations (such as Human Rights Watch which is controlled by billionaire George Soros and the Council on Foreign Relations) falsely portrayed the conflict in Darfur as a slaughter of Black Africans by a "White Arab" Sudanese government. In reality it was a civil war among many armed groups, some of which were supported by the US and Israel, fighting over limited resources in an impoverished region. Nearly everyone in Sudan is a Black African. And nearly everyone in Darfur is a Black African Arabic-speaking Muslim. The numbers cited for the “genocide” in Darfur were inflated estimates of how many people might die from famine and disease.

This year the propaganda against Sudan in the United States has intensified again. On April 30, 2006, the U.S. government in conjunction with U.S. Zionist groups, staged a large pro-war rally in Washington DC. U.S. congresspersons, as well as members of the Bush administration, spoke at the rally calling for the war against Sudan to be escalated by sending in an invasion force of U.N., NATO or U.S. troops. Nearly every pro-Israel group in the USA has anti-Sudan "genocide in Darfur" propaganda on the front of their website. In Massachusetts an example of a Zionist group doing pro-war activism is the Jewish Community Relations Council (JCRC) of Greater Boston.

The anti-Sudan rhetoric is no different than the rhetoric that the U.S. government uses against other countries that the United States is attacking. One aim of U.S. attacks against Sudan is to gain or maintain control over Sudan’s natural resources: notably petroleum but also uranium, other minerals, gum arabic, and the Nile River which supplies water to Egypt. China currently has access to oil from Sudan, and the U.S. government wants to cut China off. Destabilizing and impoverishing Sudan serves American and Israeli hegemonic interests to make sure there are no prosperous independent nations in the Middle East and North African regions.

But within the United States the anti-Sudan rhetoric is useful for more than just getting Americans ready for more overt war against Sudan. Anti-Arab and anti-Muslim rhetoric regarding Sudan is part of the general anti-Arab and anti-Muslim propaganda that is used to gain U.S. domestic support for the war in Iraq, continued U.S. support for Israel, and the so-called “war on terror”. Zionist groups in the United States have been purveying anti-Arab propaganda regarding Sudan for many years before the Darfur war, making false claims about “slavery” in Sudan. Slave redemption efforts in Sudan have been shown to be a hoax. Divesting from Sudan is a Zionist anti-Arab counter-proposal to the idea of divesting from Israel. Lies about Arabs divert attention from efforts to end Israeli apartheid in Palestine.

On September 1, 2006, the US rammed a resolution through the UN Security Council calling for tens of thousands of UN troops, ostensibly "peace-keepers" but really an imperialist invasion force, to be sent to Darfur to replace the current smaller US-puppet African Union force. On September 17, Zionists and other pro-war Americans held an anti-Sudan rally in Central Park in New York City. The keynote speaker at the rally was Madeleine Albright, Clinton's Secretary of State, who is infamous for having admitted that the Clinton administration and the UN had killed half a million Iraqi children through the sanctions in the 90s but nevertheless defending the actions against Iraq as worthwhile. Rally attendees were asked to wear blue hats to signify their desire to send "blue helmet" UN troops to invade Sudan. These UN troops would not be "peace-keepers". We can see the likely outcome by looking at Haiti where, in 2004, the US deposed the legitimate government and then sent in a UN occupation force which has terrorized the country and brutalized the Haitian people. When foreign UN soldiers get to Darfur and can't determine which Black Arabic-speaking Muslims are the "bad Arabs" and which are the "good Africans", the UN troops will kill people indiscriminately. The Sudanese people will rightly resist. The situation will escalate. US warmongers will call for sending more troops, including US troops, and bringing the war to Khartoum. It will be a disaster. The US war against Sudan needs to be stopped and reversed now.

Anti-war activists are not working hard enough to stop the US and Zionist war against Sudan. The current threats against Sudan are just as serious as the threats against Iran. Anti-war activists should be focusing more effort to stop the war against Sudan and to work against US imperialism in Africa in general - the current war against Sudan is just one manifestation of centuries of European colonialism and neo-colonialism in Sudan and Africa. The situation for the people of Sudan will improve once foreign intervention in Sudan stops.
More on Darfur
30 May 2007
Who is doing the Genocide? pleez tell us...

Post here now pleeze? Who is doing the killing?

Are the killers muslims killing non-muslims?

Let me clafify......those who CLAIM to be Muslims?

what is the religion of the poeple...what is the religion of the killers? Who is behind the killings?
*****


From Wikipedia:
The Darfur conflict is a complex crisis in the Darfur region of western Sudan. One side of the armed conflict is composed mainly of the Sudanese military and the Janjaweed, a militia group recruited mostly from the tribes of the northern Rizeigat, camel-herding nomads of Arab descent. The other side comprises a variety of rebel groups, notably the Sudan Liberation Movement and the Justice and Equality Movement, recruited primarily from the Fur, Zaghawa, and Massaleit ethnic groups. The Sudanese government, while publicly denying that it supports the Janjaweed, has provided money and assistance to the militia and has participated in joint attacks targeting the land-tilling tribes from which the Darfuri rebels draw support. Almost all of the combatants and victims in Darfur are Muslim.

http://www.savedarfur.org/content?splash=no

http://hrw.org/doc?t=africa&c=darfur

http://www.unicef.org/infobycountry/sudan_darfuroverview.html

What you need to know is that there are over 2 million in exile. There are 10,000 dying each month- with over a quarter million dead already.
And the world is largely silent.
Where is the progressive left?
Where is the outrage?
Where are the marches, the petitions, the photos on Indymedia?
Is the silence because its ....Africa?