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Announcement :: Human Rights
10/18: Thin Blue Line (Free Screening)
17 Oct 2006
Free Screening
The Thin Blue Line

Wednesday, October 18
7pm

The Thin Blue Line is a 1988 documentary film concerning the murder of a Texas police officer who had stopped a car for a routine traffic citation. The police are presented with two suspects, one a local underaged boy with a criminal record (David Ray Harris, a boy who returned to his hometown boasting that he had murdered a policeman) and the other a 28-year-old taciturn drifter with no criminal record whatsoever (Randall Dale Adams). The documentary presents testimony suggesting that the police altered, fabricated, and suppressed evidence to convict the man they wanted to be guilty, in spite of evidence to the contrary.

The film was directed by Errol Morris (who had, incidentally, spent some years before the filming as a private investigator), scored by Philip Glass, and cost more than one million dollars to make. It was entered into evidence in the federal appeal but since it was marketed as a "nonfiction" film rather than a documentary, it was not entered into evidence in the case itself. For the same reason, the film was disqualified from the Academy Award for Best Documentary. Nonetheless, Adams was finally granted a retrial and released after eleven years in prison.

The Thin Blue Line won Best Documentary honors from the New York Film Critics Circle, the Kansas City Film Critics Circle, the National Board of Review, and the National Society of Film Critics. Morris himself won an International Documentary Association Award and an Edgar Award. In December 2001, the United States' National Film Preservation Foundation declared the film "culturally significant" and announced that it would be one of the 25 films selected that year for preservation in the National Film Registry at the Library of Congress, bringing the total at the time to 325.




Upcoming Films:

October 25 - Citizen Journalism; From Pamphlet to Blog

A team from Cambridge Community Television planned, wrote, shot,
edited and distributed a short-form documentary on the subject of
Citizen Journalism in a collaborative, citizen-journalism-style
environment. The film traces Citizen Journalism in the USA from its
roots among colonial era pampleteers to today's outspoken bloggers.
The documentary features among others: Steve Garfield, Lisa Williams
and Ethan Zuckerman.


November 1 - Monsieur Verdoux

Based on a script originally written by Orson Welles, this Charlie Chaplin film is about an unemployed banker, Henri Verdoux, and his sociopathic methods of attaining income. At the time of its release (1948) in caused protest in many US cities over what was seen as a critical view of capitalism. Chaplin later left the country for Europe during the McCarthy era.



Radical Film Night at the Lucy Parsons Center
Every Wednesday night at 7pm
Always Free


Questions-Comments about the film series, contact films(-at-)lucyparsons.org


*********
ABOUT LPC
*********

+++ Where are we?

Lucy Parsons Center
549 Columbus Avenue
Boston's South End
Telephone: 617.267.6272
Email: lucyparsons (at) tao.ca
Web: http://www.lucyparsons.org/

+++ Directions

By train/public transportation: Take the Orange Line to the Mass Ave. stop, or the Green "E" line to the Symphony stop. Walk south on Mass Ave for a minute or two. Go left onto Columbus Avenue for 1-1/2 blocks. Lucy Parsons Center will be on the left.

By bus:Take the #1 Dudley/Mass Ave bus to the corner of Columbus Avenue and Mass Ave. Walk east on Columbus Avenue 1-1/2 blocks. Lucy Parsons Center will be on the left.

By car, from Storrow Drive:Exit at Copley. Go left at the light, onto Arlington Street. Continue approximately five blocks until Columbus Avenue. Go right onto Columbus Avenue for approximately eight blocks. Lucy Parsons Center will be on your right. If you reach Mass Ave, you've gone one block too far.

From I-93 N or S:Take the Storrow Drive exit. Continue 1-2 minutes on Storrow and exit at Copley. Go left at the light, onto Arlington Street. Continue approximately five blocks until Columbus Avenue. Go right onto Columbus Avenue for approximately eight blocks. Lucy Parsons Center will be on your right. If you reach Mass Ave, you've gone one block too far.

+++ What are we?

The Lucy Parsons Center, Boston's collectively run radical bookstore features an extensive selection of radical books and magazines, internet access, space for talks and meetings, and free movies Wednesday nights. Located at 549 Columbus Avenue in the South End the store is just down from Mass Ave and easily reached from the Mass Ave and Symphony T stations and the #1 bus. Regular store hours everyday 12noon-9pm.

+++ Donate MONEY!

We need support to help ensure the Lucy Parsons Center continues to grow and be an important resource for the community. Donations can be made in the form of cash, check or credit cards. Please call the store for more info. If you don't have a lot, don't worry, even donating the change of your purchase can make a difference.


Subscribe to the LPC announcement only-list:
lucy_parsons_center-subscribe (at) lists.riseup.net
See also:
http://www.lucyparsons.org/

This work is in the public domain
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