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News :: International
British Anthropologist Jeremy Keenan exposes "terror" fraud
06 Aug 2009
"The hostage taking was widely blamed on Islamic militants thought to be affiliated with Al Qaeda, but Keenan argues that the Bush administration and the Algerian government were the ones responsible."
" Jeremy Keenan argues that this area is crucial to understanding the birth of AFRICOM and the Bush administration’s expansion of the global war on terror into Africa.
Keenan is a Professor of social anthroplogy at the School of Oriental and African Studies in London and has spent over four decades working in and writing about this region. He traces AFRICOM and the US military concern over Al Qaeda’s presence in Africa back to the February 2003 kidnapping of 32 European tourists in Algeria’s Sahara desert. The hostage taking was widely blamed on Islamic militants thought to be affiliated with Al Qaeda, but Keenan argues that the Bush administration and the Algerian government were the ones responsible."


British Anthropologist Jeremy Keenan exposes "terror" fraud in Africa


As Secretary of State Hillary Clinton continues her seven-nation tour of Africa, we hear from British anthropologist Jeremy Keenan. He traces AFRICOM, the US military command in Africa, to a 2003 kidnapping of European tourists. The hostage taking was widely blamed on Islamic militants thought to be affiliated with al-Qaeda, but Keenan argues that the Bush administration and the Algerian government were the ones responsible.

Secretary of State Hillary Clinton has emphasized that her 7-country tour of Africa is intended to promote democracy, fight corruption, and boost US investments in African trade and agriculture.
We turn now to another issue that is widely expected to be discussed on every stop: AFRICOM, the US military command in Africa, which has been publicly opposed by every country on the continent except Liberia.
Now, Secretary Clinton will not be visiting the countries in and around the oil and gas rich Sahara desert—Mali, Niger, Chad, Algeria, and Mauritania. But a new book by British anthropologist Jeremy Keenan argues that this area is crucial to understanding the birth of AFRICOM and the Bush administration’s expansion of the global war on terror into Africa.
Keenan is a Professor of social anthroplogy at the School of Oriental and African Studies in London and has spent over four decades working in and writing about this region. He traces AFRICOM and the US military concern over Al Qaeda’s presence in Africa back to the February 2003 kidnapping of 32 European tourists in Algeria’s Sahara desert. The hostage taking was widely blamed on Islamic militants thought to be affiliated with Al Qaeda, but Keenan argues that the Bush administration and the Algerian government were the ones responsible.
His latest book is called “The Dark Sahara: America’s War on Terror in Africa” and its sequel titled “The Dying Sahara” will be released next year. Anjali Kamat and I spoke to Jeremy Keenan last week and asked him to lay out this story.
Jeremy Keenan, Professor of social anthropology at the School of Oriental and African Studies in London. His latest book is The Dark Sahara: America’s War on Terror in Africa. Its sequel, The Dying Sahara, will be released next year.

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This is an amazing piece and provides new insight into “terror events” worldwide. Think and share people. The truth is as plain as day. Spread widely and blow the game wide open. jamie

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