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Commentary :: International : Politics
A tale of two elections: Venezuelan accountability and U.S. irregularities
14 Nov 2012
Venezuelan voting machines have verifiable printouts, all parties participate in vote-security preparations and results are available minutes after the polls close. Compare that with U.S. elections that feature voter suppression, unaccountable voting machines accessible only by the corporations that make them, and days-long delays in many races.
There were two widely watched national elections earlier this month. In one, a popular incumbent won for the fifth time in a voting system called “the best in the world” by former U.S. President Jimmy Carter. The other election featured widespread attempts at voter suppression with many localities using computer systems with no paper backup that do not confirm the results.

The incumbent in the first example is nonetheless routinely referred to the corporate media as a “dictator” while the second country is portrayed by the same corporate media as “the world’s greatest democracy” that has the right to dictate to other countries.

The first example, as you have by now surmised, is Hugo Chávez of Venezuela.

If we were to count elections to the parliament, state and local elections, and various referendums, President Chávez and his United Socialist Party of Venezuela have won 15 of 16 elections since 1998. The lone exception was a ballot on constitutional changes that lost by two percentage points – and his reaction was simply to accept the results. Accepting a narrow defeat and allowing an opposition that bitterly hates you and everything you stand for to place a recall referendum on the ballot — it would seem that President Chávez needs to work much harder to become a “dictator.”

To read the full article, please go to http://wp.me/p2cpPS-3B
See also:
http://systemicdisorder.wordpress.com

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