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News ::
amer jubran faces prejudice media in boston
27 Aug 2001
amer jubran faces charges in brookline courts but has already been convicted by local media.
This e-mail was sent by jubrandefense (at) yahoo.com after finding an
interesting article on Town Online.
For all your local news from Eastern Massachusetts, along with
insightful commentary, breaking news stories,
local arts entertainment and sports from across Massachusetts and the
nation, visit: http://www.townonline.com

jubrandefense (at) yahoo.com also included the following message:
for any supporters of this Palestinian, he is already convicted by the
Tab on the alleged charges!

To read the full story and see photos, go to:
http://www.townonline.com/metro/brookline/opinions/23772034.htm

The land of opportunity



Reports of racism in Brookline’s past and present have recently filled
the pages of the Brookline TAB. Last week, the trial continued for a
Palestinian protester arrested by Brookline police for alleged assault,
and a TAB columnist wrote of anti-Semitism, in town and on line. This
week in the Brookline Then & Now column, two minority Brookline
residents recount their childhood in Brookline, including battles with
racism. Amer Jurbran was arrested at the Israel Independence Day festival
for kicking a passerby. He and activists claim police were trying to shut
down protests, rather than keep the peace. As the trial continues,
there is little evidence to show that Brookline police halted any
protesting, other than that of Jurbran himself. The demonstrations continued
after his arrest. Tens of thousands of people celebrated at the festival
that day, and several groups of protesters peacefully communicated.
Despite Jurban’s arrest that day, first amendment rights appear to b!
e alive and well in Brookline. Some would argue too much so. Jonathan
Kurtzman argued in his column last week that he is not only a victim of
anti Semitism but also the, in his case, the false assumption that
because he is Jewish he is pro-Israel. Racism is often married to political
bias, particularly in the case of Israel and Palestine. While political
positions may be open to debate, he said they are no more deserving of
prejudice than race or religion. Larry Ruttman’s column this week
includes stories from Brookline residents Lisa Wong and Susan Maze-Rothstein
about the prejudice they endured growing up on two different Brookline
neighborhoods. While they conclude that the town has made great
progress, they remind us to be aware that these battles are not over. Judging
by calls we received from readers this week, it can be uncomfortable to
read about racial tension in our community newspaper. A richly diverse
community such as Brookline has an opportunity to t!
urn this tension into experiences that allow the town to continue to
grow, as a community, and one person at a time. Only an atmosphere of
openness can foster this change. Open minds, open discussion, open debate
and open hearts.Of course many Brookline residents throughout history
have believed in the power of the open mind to change attitudes. For
example, Brookline is the proud hometown of Facing History and Ourselves,
an educational program that has fostered cultural understanding
worldwide. And there are plenty of ways Brookline celebrates its racial,
ethnic and cultural diversity, such as in the upcoming annual Festival in
the Park.But for all our progress, racism is prevalent, and won’t go away
if we minimize in our conversations and interactions, or in our
newspapers. Brookline residents have more than good intentions. They have an
opportunity to look out any given Brookline window and meet a neighbor
of a different race. In such a town, awareness can only foster progr!
ess. 
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