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Announcement :: Organizing
Malcolm X... A Tribute
18 Feb 2005
40 years ago, February 21, 1965, Malcolm X was assassinated at the Audubon Ballroom in New York City. The late actor and activist Ossie Davis eulogized Malcolm X six days later, February 27, 1965 at the Faith Temple Church of God. Ossie Davis asked the question, “Did you ever really listen to him?”
Malcolm X,

40 Years Later

…A Tribute



Monday, February 21, 2005



Roxbury Community College

Student Activity Building, Cafeteria

Boston, MA

4 – 7 pm,

Free! Refreshment will be provided



Performance by:

The Foundation



Featured Speakers:

Askia Toure

Tony Van Der Meer



Tributes by:

Chuck Turner

Mel Miller

Diane Wilkerson*

Horace Smalls

Charles Yancey

Sarah Ann Shaw*

David Barkley

Gloria Fox

Ambrizeth Lima

Rev. Steven Thomas

*invited, not confirmed



Sponsored by:

Roxbury Community College Student Government

The Malcolm & Martin International Days of Reflection Committee

The Cultural Café



A Tribute to Malcolm X



40 years ago, February 21, 1965, Malcolm X was assassinated at the Audubon Ballroom in New York City. The late actor and activist Ossie Davis eulogized Malcolm X six days later, February 27, 1965 at the Faith Temple Church of God. Ossie Davis asked the question, “Did you ever really listen to him?”



It is with this question posed by Ossie Davis, that we pay tribute to Brother Malcolm X, and take up the continuing process of reflecting on what Brother Malcolm X said, what were his ideas, and why they are important for us now.



As Ossie Davis pointed out in Brother Malcolm’s eulogy, “There are those who will consider it their duty as friends of the Negro people to tell us to revile him, to flee, even from the presence of his memory, to save ourselves by writing him out of the history of our turbulent times.” This is why Brother Malcolm himself impressed upon us to think for ourselves, to see for ourselves, and to make decisions for ourselves, or we will have others thinking, seeing and deciding for us.



While it is important for us to use February 21st as a Day of Reflection and take a moment of silence to pay tribute to brother Malcolm, our greatest tribute to him is to work together in unity in order to create the community and world that we want, a world of peace, justice and equality. Malcolm X said that, “The main thing is that we keep a united front wherein our most valuable time and energy will not be wasted fighting each other.”



It is in this spirit that we call for February 21st, the day Malcolm was assassinated and April 4th, the assassination of Dr. King – National Days of Reflection. It is important that these tributes be from the community upwards and not from the corporations downwards. We call for this to begin on the anniversary of Malcolm’s death because it was he who made a concerted effort to reach out to Dr. King in unity. We believe that Malcolm and Dr. King are symbolic of the kind of power that unity among different segments of our communities can mean in bringing about peace, justice and equality.



With unity, we can better struggle to transform the “nightmare” of our historical experiences and present conditions as a people that brother Malcolm critically talked about. It is from this point that we can begin developing our “dream” or the vision that Dr. King projected. In other words, we must know where we come from in order to know where we are going.



We need unity to oppose and bring the end of war and occupation in Iraq and the occupation of Haiti. We need unity to oppose and bring an end to Israeli military occupation and segregation of Palestinian people. We need unity to get the U.S. government to stop spending billions of dollars on war and occupation abroad and direct that money to social programs at home. We need unity to ensure that education, health care, housing and employment are human rights that we are all entitled to. We need unity for our own internal transformation.



It is with unity that we can properly pay tribute to Malcolm X. Be sure to make February 21st, a Day of Reflection for Brother Malcolm X. Take a moment of silence.



By Tony Menelik Van Der Meer for the Malcolm and Martin International Days of Reflection Committee.

This work is in the public domain
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