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News ::
Boston Phoenix Shows Obvious Establishment Bias
29 Dec 2000
Phoenix reporter belittles protests at Dem. Convention in LA which summarizes as follows: "Once again, the country focused on dramatic TV images of riot-gear-clad police terrorizing protesters. And again, observers drew parallels with the 1960s: the clash between protesters and police outside a Democratic convention called to mind the riots that took place at the 1968 Democratic National Convention in Chicago. Few observers remarked on the fact that the 1968 protesters had raged against the war; in 2000, protesters seemed willing to antagonize the Man over little more than a concert."
Follow the link to the full article:

http://www.bostonphoenix.com/archive/features/00/12/28/PROTEST.html

"On the meeting's first night, while the Clintons delivered their farewell speeches inside the Staples Center, the politically active, anti-establishment band Rage Against the Machine entertained protesters who had gathered outside. At the set's end, as police prepared to close down the concert -- which was over -- some concertgoers took to throwing rocks at the cops, who, in turn, fired rubber pellets into the crowd. Once again, the country focused on dramatic TV images of riot-gear-clad police terrorizing protesters. And again, observers drew parallels with the 1960s: the clash between protesters and police outside a Democratic convention called to mind the riots that took place at the 1968 Democratic National Convention in Chicago. Few observers remarked on the fact that the 1968 protesters had raged against the war; in 2000, protesters seemed willing to antagonize the Man over little more than a concert.
See also:
http://www.bostonphoenix.com/archive/features/00/12/28/PROTEST.html
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Comments

my favorite
30 Dec 2000
my favorite part is: "Protesters today couldn't do the same, at least not without ticking off a list of causes ranging from the inspired (stop the environmental scourge of globalism) to the tired (free Mumia Abu-Jamal)." Tired? Yeah, I'm sure Mumia feels getting off death row is much to passe' too, definately not the chic protest.
The article actually comes out in favor of the anti-golibization/social justice movements going on, but its all written in that clumsy, columnist style, the one where it seems like the writer took five minutes to write the thing and fills it with their "oh-so-hip" judgements. Even the so-called "alternative papers" can't get past that, that's the "writing style that gets readers." If the phoenix wasn't free, I'd never pick it up. Good for collages though.
Problems with the Phoenix
04 Jan 2001
I agree wholeheartedly with dinklebat's comments above. The most disheartening part about this is what the Phoenix used to be. It used to be a wonderful radical, community-based newspaper. Chomsky and Zinn used to write pieces for it. Eric Mann, who was a prominent figure in the student movement of the time, wrote regularly for them about issues ranging from TV to George Jackson. Overall, it was a lot more radical and vital. Now, when a voice like that is needed again, it's a nice, liberal paper, firmly in the Democratic Party's camp. We'll just have to make our own alternatives...
Problems with the Phoenix
04 Jan 2001
I agree wholeheartedly with dinklebat's comments above. The most disheartening part about this is what the Phoenix used to be. It used to be a wonderful radical, community-based newspaper. Chomsky and Zinn used to write pieces for it. Eric Mann, who was a prominent figure in the student movement of the time, wrote regularly for them about issues ranging from TV to George Jackson. Overall, it was a lot more radical and vital. Now, when a voice like that is needed again, it's a nice, liberal paper, firmly in the Democratic Party's camp. We'll just have to make our own alternatives...