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Commentary :: Human Rights : Politics : War and Militarism
Marrow
05 Apr 2008
<p>It is in the core of the soul, something which renews and reinvigorates us when we need it most. It helps us find the essence of what it means to be free. Regardless of culture, creed or religion we despise that which binds us to subjugation. Our national freedoms motivate us and reflect a collective character. That is why lies coming from the current administration and the national intelligence services under them concerning 9/11 and what has happened since anger so many.</p>
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It is in the core of the soul, something which renews and reinvigorates us when we need it most. It helps us find the essence of what it means to be free. Regardless of culture, creed or religion we despise that which binds us to subjugation. Our national freedoms motivate us and reflect a collective character. That is why lies coming from the current administration and the national intelligence services under them concerning 9/11 and what has happened since anger so many.
Free communities function best when they have rules governing them and when competent people are hired to enforce those rules. The same goes for nations. Bonds forged in difficult times grow strong and our present situation is especially taxing. Although we each live separately the present economic crisis affects everyone. Most of us will never meet, but we suffer a loss together each time another soldier perishes in Iraq. Right now we are concerned with our national future, and there is a tiny crack displaying something rotten at the top.
Will power, drive and self awareness are characteristically human. In moments when we lose positive momentum these traits can help us learn from what we see to move towards a better vision. We are in a position now to do that, but we need to know where we are to decide where to go next and how to get there. It’s time to rediscover our north.
If government is the vehicle then government employees are those we’ve hired as drivers and wrong turn excuses aren’t comforting a nation. We have been through confusing moments in the past, and we used collective strength to see our way past them. We can do that again.
Presently we have a leadership issue. They asked our permission to take the helm, we gave the reigns to them and the intelligence services under them, and we are partly to blame. We cannot expect politicians to be perfect as we are realizing no person is without sin. They are about as ready for sainthood as are we. Born from us, raised with us and sent forward by us they are a reflection of us.
That said, we cannot allow our economy, military and civil liberties to be liquidated by our own employees because some nuts wish us dead. There will always be crazies to fight; those who hate us and even those who want to kill us. Things cannot run haywire when that happens and if it does the people in the kitchen picked the wrong career.
The ability to handle stress and adversity with a clear head and strength of character are important traits for decision makers. Personally I’m not that concerned about what happened when someone was a teenager, an affair they may have had, minor personal lapses or even a DUI, because at times like this, it is important how decision makers handle crisis. Personal messes piling up during a representative’s tenure are inexcusable, but we all make mistakes and forgiveness helps strengthen people. The inability to learn from mistakes, however, never goes unpunished.
What rating do we give the current administration and the national intelligence branches which serve them especially those who have been there longest? The marks don’t reflect what we would like to see our employees aspire to. When I was at The University of Connecticut’s Landscape Architecture Program I experienced government employees run amuck so I feel particularly strongly about the issue.
The ability to see tragedy coming, to avert it and handle things in the best interests of those you serve if a tragedy does occur are indicators of job performance for those hired to manage a country. In large corporations when someone in a management position performs inadequately restructuring happens, and areas which no longer serve the needs of the company are retooled, phased out or just cut out. There is nothing stopping us from doing the same thing here. It’s our government and it should work to serve us. Those who begin to think it’s the other way around or who become warped by their power need to be checked.
The current administration and its’ national intelligence services are to blame for the culture of inefficiency, incompetence and corruption they have created for the next administration and future generations to inherit. The next time there is a national crisis like 9/11 elected officials should not believe they make decisions because other Americans are afraid to, they should make good decisions because that’s what they are hired to do. The current administration received low marks on their tests, and hopefully the next will be selected from the top of the barrel. We have the opportunity to make that selection now, and with faith we can find the marrow to do it right this time.
To read more about my experiences at The University of Connecticut go to www.lawsuitagainstuconn.com.
See also:
http://www.lawsuitagainstuconn.com

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