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Commentary :: Politics
New England/Maritimes Before The Border Was A Big Deal
14 Nov 2004
Found this interesting map from the period just before Canada imposed controls on the border, which were followed by American controls.
Click on image for a larger version

intercolonialrailway.jpg
Map crica 1890, when most trade in New England and the Maritimes went north and south between the two. At that time, it was very common for families to have close relatives in both New England and the Maritimes.

This work is in the public domain
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Map if the Maritimes were to join the network.
14 Nov 2004
Click on image for a larger version

networkofautonomouscommonwealths.gif
Open source.
Re: New England/Maritimes Before The Border Was A Big Deal
14 Nov 2004
has someone asked anybody in the Maritimes
and Quebec how they would feel joimg with New England.......?
They've published much of this on the front page of their IMC.
14 Nov 2004
In any case, no one needs permission to discuss ideas. You need consent to realize ideas. There has been discussion in the Maritimes in past decades of uniting with New England, especially if Quebec leaves Canada. Before the border was enforced, the Maritimes enjoyed a much better economy as much of their commerce was with New England. When the border was enforced, their trade moved East to West, over a greater distance and they were forced to compete with those parts of Canada further away (e.g. Ontario).

Similarly, when the border was enforced, Northern New England too became impoverished for similar reasons.

Quebec, I believe, would not want to join. They have struggled long and hard to be independent and I think they want to go on their own.
One more thing.
14 Nov 2004
If you've ever spent time in New Brunswick, you'd learn that Saint John's culture is very much like Boston's (the cities neighborhoods even look similar to some parts of Boston). If you go to Fredrickton, you'd sware you were in New Hampshire. The accent in New Brunswick is very similar to that in New England (with a few Canadian overtones). Historically, Maritimers have referred to New England as "The Boston States" and many of them have a fond view of New England.
Re: New England/Maritimes Before The Border Was A Big Deal
14 Nov 2004
Yes, and the Maritimes are also where all the Loyalists fled after the end of the Revolutionary War.
New England was not anti-English after the American "revolution".
15 Nov 2004
New England kept its ties with England in terms of commerce and in terms of its relationship with the Maritimes. This long time contact has made the Eastern New England dialect of English the closest there is in the US to British English.

New Englander's opposed the war of 1812 because they wished to continue trade with England and saw no reason to get involved in a French/English conflict.

I wonder to what degree the flow of Loyalists out of New England into the Maritimes changed the political history of the region. It would stand to reason that the Maritimes became even more Loyalist as a result of this influx and, therefore, remained steadfast against merging with the US.
Re: New England/Maritimes Before The Border Was A Big Deal
15 Nov 2004
Martimers have more in common with New Englanders than with Upper Canadians. They wouldn't be inclined to join the USA, but they would think long and hard about a confederacy with their New England cousins.

check out maritimes.indymedia.org for more discussion