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Commentary :: Human Rights
Pope was right in Word - Wrong in Deed
06 Apr 2005
Modified: 02:42:44 AM
HIS VIEWS ON MORALITY AND THE EVILS OF MODERNITY were nearly perfect: homosexuality, birth control, abortion and women's roles in the church. This is quite hard for the narrow-minded left of the US or Europe to understand
06-1987-pinochet_papa.jpg83y4q5.jpgthumb.jpg
“Wealth should not be accumulated for its own sake. It should not be gained by injustice or oppression. Wealth often leads to covetousness. It belongs to God, not to us; we are simply stewards. We sin if we do not use it to help the poor, the weak, and the oppressed (Ezek. 22:29)

Most people in wealthy countries are raised to be fully middle class and materialistic - even most activists and people who think or pretend to be poor......

The Pope understood more about human development and long-term needs than almost any one who has ever lived. His great mistake was in underestimating capitalist materialism and the Evil of GW Bush (and almost all Americans!)

Pope John Pauldid and said many great things. However, his experiences in Poland under the Nazis and Communists (stalinists) did warp his perceptions of the spiritual and also the real battles raging across the planet.

He thought that if he vanquished communism that the Church could deal with the excesses of capitalism. In this ONE VIEW ONLY was he wrong. But this was a terrible blunder that will doom him to be regarded AS ONE OF THE MOST EVIL MEN IN HISTROY!

HIS VIEWS ON MORALITY AND THE EVILS OF MODERNITY were nearly perfect: homosexuality, birth control, abortion and women's roles in the church. This is quite hard for the narrow-minded left of the US or Europe to understand - though they matter little now that Bush has taken over the West and the Pope has deformed Latin America.

The Pope opposed these social-moral diseases because he knew that to accept them meant to embrace band-aids rather than truth. He wanted a spiritual life for all instead of a life mediated by technology and vices.

From the Sermon on the Mount, Matthew 6:19- 31
"Do not store up for yourselves treasures on earth, where moth and rust consume and where thieves break in and steal…”

Jesus asked his followers to sell everything, give their money to the poor and follow him. It is a time-honored tradition in India for a man who has completed his working life to give away his possessions and retreat to the forest to pray.

The focus of Islamic life is devotion and surrender to Allah. Theravadan Buddhist monks take a vow of extreme poverty as they dedicate themselves to realizing the Buddha's teaching. The world's prophets knew that the material world offered limited satisfaction and directed us to look beyond it.

“The message of the Christmas tree is that life is always green if you give, not many material things, but of yourself through friendship and sincere affection, through help and forgiveness, by spending time together and listening to each other," said Pope John Paul, December 19, 2004.

(http://uk.news.yahoo.com/041219/325/f8uy9.html)

“Wealth should not be accumulated for its own sake. It should not be gained by injustice or oppression. Wealth often leads to covetousness. It belongs to God, not to us; we are simply stewards. We sin if we do not use it to help the poor, the weak, and the oppressed (Ezek. 22:29)

--- “Watch out! Be on your guard against all kinds of greed” (Luke 12:15


"The church in Latin America has much to say about humanity. ...
It looks at the sad picture portrayed by the Puebla conference:

faces of landless peasants mistreated and killed by the forces of power, faces of laborers arbitrarily dismissed and without a living wage for their families, faces of the elderly, faces of outcasts, faces of slum dwellers, faces of poor children who from infancy begin to feel the cruel sting of social injustice.

For them, it seems, there is no future – no school, no high school, no university.
By what right have we cataloged persons as first-class persons or second-class persons?
In the theology of human nature there is only one class: children of God." - Oscar Romero


The Pope's Economics:

He probably hoped for a type of Christian Socialism, but never could describe it. John Paul II was no follower of neo-liberalism. For him, markets and profits were not a solution to human problems, but a mechanism to be used for moral purposes. Indeed, we often forget that both Adam Smith and Herbert Spencer’s reasoning are very similar. Both of them – the two greatest thinkers that promoted the idea of the free market – were also moral philosophers. For them, as for John Paul II, the free market and profits were ways to improve humanity. They were sometimes naive, as when Spencer hoped that rich citizens would nearly automatically be good citizens and thus find it natural to help those who were not so successful. John Paul II might have been naive, too, but only up to a point.

Everything depends on our idea of human nature. If we believe, as the Catholic Church believes, that human beings bear the burden of original sin, but are perfectible; that human beings can understand what is good and bad and can choose between them because we have free will, then approval of the free market is understandable and not naive. By this one encyclical, John Paul II moved Church teaching from the Middle Ages to modernity.

The debate the Pope began on the relationship between the free market and moral problems remains unfinished. Eliminating the abuses that accompany capitalism and harnessing it for the benefit of society and human morals still needs to be tackled. John Paul II had the courage to raise the fundamental questions that needed asking. Will we continue to ask them without his leadership and prompting?

http://www.commondreams.org/views05/0404-33.htm
- Archbishop Oscar Romero, March 2, 1980

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Re: Pope was right in Word - Wrong in Deed
06 Apr 2005
http://barcelona.indymedia.org/newswire/display/168538/index.php


Sólo le recordó que su papel era "mantener buena relación con el gobierno" salvadoreño.
Lunes 4 de abril de 2005

STELLA CALLONI

"En El Salvador no existe un conflicto entre el pueblo y el gobierno como quieren hacer creer muchos funcionarios. Existe un conflicto entre el gobierno y el pueblo, un pueblo que está sufriendo muchos horrores, y la Iglesia y sus pastores tienen que estar con él".

Esas fueron las palabras de moseñor Oscar Arnulfo Romero cuando en Roma se entrevistó con el entonces flamante papa Juan Pablo II, quien ni siquiera se detuvo a mirar los informes, las fotografías y las copias de las cartas enviadas por el arzobispo de San Salvador, en su desesperado pedido de auxilio para detener la matanza del pueblo salvadoreño -murieron 70 mil personas- a manos del ejército, la Guardia y los escuadrones de la muerte.

Aquella noche de agosto de 1979, cuando conocí a monseñor Romero, a quien había llegado a entrevistar al arzobispado de San Salvador, se podía percibir la tristeza provocada por la indiferencia del nuevo jerarca católico, después de haber hecho enormes esfuerzos para llegar a Roma, porque "creía que algunas manos negras impedían que cartas e informes llegaran a destino".

Cuando entró a la habitación venía de una misión pastoral, nada menos que salvar a niños cuyos padres habían sido asesinados esa tarde por el ejército salvadoreño y los paramilitares. Traía a un pequeño en sus brazos y otros, temblando por la lluvia y la tormenta de ese día, se colgaban de su sotana mojada.

Así como estaba se sentó para contar, con la voz cargada de tristeza, las penurias de su país. "De todo esto quería hablar con el Santo Padre", decía señalando a los refugiados, a los sobrevivientes de las matanzas. Durante aquella entrevista recibió siete amenazas telefónicas.

No quería hablar con el Papa de las amenazas en su contra, sino de "los crímenes cometidos contra un pueblo indefenso". Quería hablar de los sacerdotes asesinados en el país en los últimos años, como Rutilio Grande, Ernesto Barrera, Octavio Ortiz Luna Rafael Palacios, y Alirio Napoleón Macías. "Fueron asesinados porque estaban haciendo lo que debían, estaban cumpliendo su misión con los pobres y los desamparados", dijo.

Eso quiso explicarle a Juan Pablo II en sus cartas. Luego había ido a Roma y se encontró con la imposibilidad de ver al Papa a través de los canales normales del Vaticano. Casi obligado a regresar a su país, recurrió a una acción desesperada, que fue la de mezclarse con los fieles para contactar al jefe de la Iglesia.

Buscaba una palabra de justicia para el pueblo salvadoreño, y sólo encontró indiferencia. Esa indiferencia que alentó a sus asesinos el 24 de marzo de 1980.

Un domingo en que el Papa bajó al gran salón para la audiencia general, logró colocarse en primera fila y cuando Wojtyla lo saludó, le retuvo la mano para implorarle una audiencia.

Llevaba en sus manos las pruebas del horror. Pero su primera sorpresa fue un regaño de Juan Pablo II por lo "voluminoso" que era el material que traía. María López Vigil, quien escribió un libro sobre monseñor Romero, cuenta que el Papa le dijo al arzobispo salvadoreño: "¡Ya les he dicho que no vengan cargados con tantos papeles!"

Ni siquiera quiso mirar las fotografías de los sacerdotes asesinados. Recuerda López Vigil que monseñor Romero insistió sobre el caso de la víctima más reciente, el padre Octavio Ortiz. "Yo lo ordené y sabía de todos los trabajos en que andaba. El día aquel estaba dando un curso de evangelio a los muchachos del barrio... nos lo mataron diciendo que era un guerrillero."

"El Papa mira fijamente la foto y no pregunta más. Mira después los empañados ojos del arzobispo Romero y mueve la mano hacia atrás, como queriéndole quitar dramatismo -¿Y acaso no lo era?- contesta".

Monseñor Romero quería mostrar otras fotos. Nada quiso ver el Papa, que sólo habló para recordarle que su papel como arzobispo era mantener buenas relaciones con el gobierno. Romero volvió a El Salvador. En aquella entrevista, parecía implorar que alguna luz iluminara a Juan Pablo II. Todavía esperaba.
Mira també:
http://www.jornada.unam.mx/2005/abr05/050404/026n2mun.php
Re: Pope was right in Word - Wrong in Deed
06 Apr 2005
Que?